Cultural Respect and Humility as Core Relational Elements of Psychotherapy (working with Asian Americans)

  • Saturday, May 18, 2019
  • 10:00 AM - 2:00 PM
  • 2530 J Street, Suite 310, Sacramento, CA (Office of Amy Ahlfeld)

Registration


Registration is closed



Presenters: Dr. My Linh Vo & Dr. Matthew R. Mock


Schedule:

10 - 12: Training (cost covers the training plus 2 CE credits)

12:30 - 3: No host lunch/mixer at Cantina Alley 


Acquiring sensitivity, knowledge, and clinical skills in working with diverse and complex cultural communities is essential in psychotherapy.  Cultural respect and humility, while working with Asian Americans as an example, requires deep commitment to cultural respect, humility and ongoing striving for competency. Many current core issues being addressed in the Asian American community will be presented. Some example core issues such as intra-Asian diversity, the role of family, immigrant versus refugee status, acculturation, acculturation, culture shock, generational influences, the “model minority” myth, racism and discrimination as they impact Asian identity will be discussed. Issues such as domestic violence, interracial marriage, biculturalism, substance abuse, child abuse, psychiatric diagnoses, violence against Asians, and the role of early child rearing practices and family dynamics, may be addressed.  Interrelated issues with other ethnic communities and their histories will also be covered.


Several important issues such as shame and stigma of mental illness, attributions and conceptualization of illness, traditional Eastern versus Western views and methods of healing, individual versus systemic or familial interventions, effective components of psychotherapy, and transference and countertransference in the psychotherapeutic context will be discussed.  Case vignettes illustrating these topics and successful treatment interventions as well as related research themes will be presented.


As a cultural example, attendees will learn briefly about some of the history, cultural influences, diversity and experiences of Asian Americans and AAPIs. Using this as core, foundational reference attendees will review the multiple issues and concepts related to the psychology of Asian individuals, families and communities.  Cultural competence and responsiveness in working with Asian Americans means not only understanding others, but also understanding ourselves and the communities around us.  Cultural competency, cultural responsiveness and cultural humility have become imperatives in clinical and service practices in working with Asian American individuals, families and groups.  Core issues such as intra-Asian diversity, the role of family, immigrant versus refugee status, acculturation, acculturation, culture shock, generational influences, the “model minority” myth, racism and discrimination as they impact Asian identity will be discussed. Recommendations from nationally recognized mental health experts as well as evidence-based practices, practice based evidence and effective practices will be discussed.               

     

This course is being held in special recognition of Asian American Heritage Month acknowledged every May of every year.  As such, this will be a dynamic, engaging and inspiring day of learning for all!


CPA is co-sponsoring with Sacramento Valley Psychological Association. CPA is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists and recognized by the BBS to offer CE credit for its licensees. CPA maintains responsibility for this program and its contents. 


CE Credits currently pending review, please email drcheperka@gmail.com if you have any questions.

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